The Loch Ness Monster on Google Earth

superNESSIETHIS amazing image on Google Earth could be the elusive proof that the Loch Ness Monster exists. Picked out by a Google Earth satellite, is this the Loch Ness monster… or just a boat? Security guard Jason, 25, of Nottingham, said: “I couldn’t believe it. It’s just like the descriptions of Nessie.” Researcher Adrian Shine, of the Loch Ness Project, said: “This is really intriguing. It needs further study.” Sightings have been claimed for centuries. The shape seen on the surface of the 22-mile Scottish loch is 65ft long and appears to have an oval body, a tail and four legs or flippers. It promised the world views of the entire planet from their laptop. But could Google Earth have unravelled our favourite mystery of the deep?
One internet fan claims he found the legendary Loch Ness monster in satellite images on the virtual globe. Security guard Jason Cooke said the 65ft oblong shape followed by thin strands is actually the highly contested creature supposed to inhabit Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands. Is this it?

LochNess Nessie enthusiasts believe the creature is a plesiosaur – an aquatic reptile that appeared at the start of the Jurassic period and is widely believed to be extinct. Some claimed a series of vertebrae uncovered on the shores of Loch Ness were ‘proof’ that there was a living plesiosaur in the Loch. Adrian Shine, a researcher on the Loch Ness project, called the new images ‘really intriguing’ and said they deserved further study. The Loch Ness Monster has been a subject of mass intrigue and debate since it came to the world’s attention in 1933. Scientists have widely written off the idea as a modern-day myth and continued sightings as set ups and wishful thinking. Yet it has remained a contested phenomenon for almost 80 years.The latest tantalising sighting can be seen on Google Earth using the co-ordinates Latitude 57°12’52.13″N, Longitude 4°34’14.16″W.  news from dailymail.co.uk

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………

superNESSIE2The Loch Ness Monster is a creature reputed to inhabit Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands. It is similar to other supposed lake monsters in Scotland and elsewhere, though its description varies from one account to the next. Popular interest and belief in the animal has fluctuated since it was brought to the world’s attention in 1933. Evidence of its existence is anecdotal, with minimal and much disputed photographic material and sonar readings. The scientific community regards the Loch Ness Monster as a modern-day myth, and explains sightings as a mix of hoaxes and wishful thinking. Despite this, it remains one of the most famous examples of cryptozoology. The legendary monster has been affectionately referred to by the diminutive Nessie (Scottish Gaelic: Niseag)since the 1950s. The term “monster” was reportedly coined on 2 May 1933 by Alex Campbell, the water bailiff for Loch Ness and a part-time journalist, in a report in the Inverness Courier.

PlesiosaurOn 4 August 1933, the Courier published as a full news item the claim of a London man, George Spicer, that a few weeks earlier while motoring around the Loch, he and his wife had seen “the nearest approach to a dragon or pre-historic animal that I have ever seen in my life”, trundling across the road toward the Loch carrying “an animal” in its mouth. Other letters began appearing in the Courier, often anonymously, with claims of land or water sightings, either on the writer’s part or on the parts of family, acquaintances or stories they remembered being told. These stories soon reached the national (and later the international) press, which talked of a “monster fish”, “sea serpent”, or “dragon”,eventually settling on “Loch Ness Monster”. On 6 December 1933 the first purported photograph of the monster, taken by Hugh Gray, was published, and shortly after the creature received official notice when the Secretary of State for Scotland ordered the police to prevent any attacks on it. In 1934, interest was further sparked by what is known as The Surgeon’s Photograph. In the same year R. T. Gould published a book,the first of many which describe the author’s personal investigation and collected record of additional reports pre-dating the summer of 1933. Other authors made claims that sightings of the monster went as far back as the 6th century (see below).

logo-108x89123

Dear friend,
this is an open project and accepts the help of anyone willing to make positive thinking…
Send your proposals (articles, cartoons, funny pictures and videos) and find an open door where to move your ideas … POSITIVE!
Support and Spread the only e-magazine dedicated to good news and smiles!

Write to: goodnewsenglish@goodnews.ws
Show on your site a link to our www.goodnews.ws

Share This Post